Book List
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Little Red Riding Hood by Trina Schart Hyman
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The Rough-Faced Girl by Rafe Martin
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The Lion and the Mouse by Jim Storey
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The Tortoisse and the Hare by Armand Eisen
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Beauty and the Beast by Jan Brett

Brett, J. (1989).Beauty and the beast. New York: G.P. Putnam’s sons.Summary: Beauty and the Beast is a traditional fairytale. A merchant goes on a journey with the promise that he will bring his daughter, Beauty, a rose when he returns. The merchant picks a beautiful rose from the Beast’s garden. As a consequence, Beauty is sent to live with the Beast. Hesitant at first, she learns to love the Beast. When Beauty decides to marry the Beast a curse is broken and he turns into a handsome prince.Generalization: LT 1: Students will understand that everyone has heroic qualities. LT 3: Students will understand that we can look to our inner hero for guidance in tough situations. Skill/Strategy LT 1: Students will be able to compare and contrast the characteristics of different heroes. Skill/Strategy LT 3: Students will be able to identify and explain the problem and solution the hero faced in a text.Use in Unit: This book will be the final book in our themed literature unit and will be featured in a Read Aloud. As a class we will examine heroic traits, compare and contrast traits, examine the inner hero of the beast, and identify problem and solution of the story.
Eisen, A. (1992). A treasury of children’s literature. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company.Summary: The Aesop’s Fable The Tortoise and the Hare is a tale of determination and perseverance. The big race between the two animals outlines the importance of identifying one’s personal strengths
Generalization: LT 3: Students will understand that we can look to our inner hero for guidance in tough situations. Skill/Strategy LT 2: Students will be able to make text-to-self connections through the identification of heroic character traits.Use in Unit: This fable will be choral read. Students will identify the heroic traits of the Tortoise and link the text to their own life by talking about a personal experience when they were involved in a competition.
Faulkner, M. (1986).Jack and the beanstalk. New York: Scholastic, Inc.Summary: Jack and the Beanstalk is an English folktale about a young boy and his mother. The boy trades the family cow for some magic beans. The mother thinks the boy foolish, but the beans grow into a giant beanstalk. Upon exploration the boy discovers he is a prince. He encounters the giant three times and each time he acquires treasures. The boy and his mother end up happily ever after.
Generalization: LT 1: Students will understand that everyone has heroic qualities. LT 2: Students will understand that people can be heroes in both big and small ways. Skill/Strategy LT 3: Students will be able to identify and explain the problem and solution the hero faced in a text. Use in Unit: This book will be used in a Read Aloud. Through this book we will explore the literacy strategy of problem-solution. We will also use the story to reference heroic traits and how one can be a hero in both big and small ways.
Hyman, T.S. (1987). Little red riding hood. New York: Holiday House.
Summary: Little Red Riding Hood is a classic tale from The Brothers Grimm. It tells the story of a young girl who sets forth on a journey to her Grandmother’s house. Along the way she meets a wolf who fools her into telling him where she is going. Grandma and Red get eaten by the wolf, but in the end they are saved by the kind huntsman.
Generalization: LT 1: Students will understand that everyone has heroic qualities.
Skill/Strategy LT 1: Students will be able to compare and contrast the characteristics of different heroes.

Use in Unit: We will be using this book for a Read Aloud at the beginning of our unit to help us identify heroic traits and to compare and contrast character traits. For example, Red is brave, thoughtful, courageous, honest, and curious and the Huntsman is brave, curious, strong, and courageous.
Martin, R. (1992). The rough-faced girl. New York: Putnam Berkley Group, Inc.
Summary: The Rough-Faced Girl is the Algonquin version of the Cinderella story. Two sisters set out to marry the powerful invisible being, but he can only be with the one who truly sees him. The youngest sister who is scarred and burned from tending the fire sees the Invisible Being everywhere and is the only villager who can answer questions about him correctly. Generalization: LT 1: Students will understand that everyone has heroic qualities. LT 3: Students will understand that we can look to our inner hero for guidance in tough situations.Use in text: This book will be Read Aloud. It will be used to help students further identify heroic traits. Rough-Faced girl proves to be beautiful, courageous, kind-hearted, brave, hard-worker, and creative. This book will also lead our class into a discussion about inner beauty and inner heroes and how they help us succeed through tough situations.
Storey, J. (1996). The lion and the mouse. Bothell, WA: Wright Group Publishing, Inc.
Summary: The Aesop’s Fable The Lion and the Mouse tells the story of friendship in an unlikely place. At the beginning of the story the lion shows compassion toward the mouse when he decides to let him go. The mouse promises to help the lion someday. At the end of the story when the lion is caught in a net by huntsmen the little mouse comes to lion’s rescue.Generalization: LT 2: Students will understand that people can be heroes in both big and small ways. Skill/Strategy LT 2: Students will be able to make text-to-self connections through the identification of heroic character traitsUse in Unit: This fable will help students understand that we can be heroes in both big and small ways. We will examine the two characters and their mutual good deeds toward one another and connect their behavior with our own life experiences resulting in text-to-self connections.


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